Bonaparte, Bravery, and the Beatles

Posted in Susan Fekety on July 26th, 2011
Unless otherwise noted, © Copyright 2011 by Susan Fekety. All Rights Reserved.

For years I’ve taken shoulder- of- the-season long weekend retreats to Corea, Maine — a little town on the Schoodic peninsula that looks like something out of a picture book.  It is simple and placid and beyond quiet, since it is beyond the bulk of Acadia National Park. My grownup version of “are we there yet?” is watching for the giant fisherman sign at the Stinson Seafood sardine cannery in Prospect Harbor, right next door.

Last year the cannery closed down and a lot of the locals lost work because of it.  Evidently the plant is undergoing a renaissance of sorts in a conversion to processing lobster instead of sardines, but for many years, sardines were where it was at in this sweet little coastal village. Sardines are no longer….popular. We turn up our noses; we pick the canned tuna instead.  Perhaps in your house this is true as well.  It is more than a little sad, to see things like this fading away.

Read more »

Food as Medicine 6.13.11

Posted in Susan Fekety on June 13th, 2011
Unless otherwise noted, © Copyright 2011 by Susan Fekety. All Rights Reserved.

Heading home after 5 days at the Center for Mind-Body Medicine’s Food as Medicine conference.  It is a glorious spring day, of the sort that makes you feel rather optimistic about just about everything — clear and bright, with clean air (or clean enough — this is a city, after all.)  Managed to find myself a decent breakfast in hostile territory — one of the airport kiosks actually had plain Greek yogurt and containers of surprisingly good strawberries and blueberries.

As I spied on my traveling companions, I was struck again by the aptness of Mark Hyman’s characterization of the diabesity epidemic as a “social disease” — not just our food industry, but all our food relationships present a challenge, and it does appear to be infectious. This is one of the reasons I like my FirstLine Therapy healthy living groups — when we come together to share our experiences making lifestyle changes, and celebrate successes swimming upstream in a toxic food culture, things are SO much easier, and we are much less likely to surrender to “what everyone else is having.” We nourish our immune system this way.

Read more »

Food as Medicine 6.12.11

Posted in Susan Fekety on June 12th, 2011
Unless otherwise noted, © Copyright 2011 by Susan Fekety. All Rights Reserved.

Friends, this post finds me with a mind on fire and a body challenged by too many hours in a chair.  In a meeting room.  In a hotel basement.  And this is despite having set and accomplished an intention to always take the stairs, to circumnavigate the block on foot during breaks, and at lunch, do resistance band and core exercises in my room, and take a long walk after dinner.  Something in me does not like the sedentary thing.  I suppose it is good that I notice my relative indolence so mightily. But how many people do you know for whom sitting sitting sitting is a way of life? Ouch.

Read more »

Food as Medicine Conference 6.9.11

Posted in Susan Fekety on June 10th, 2011
Unless otherwise noted, © Copyright 2011 by Susan Fekety. All Rights Reserved.

And so.  Here I sit in a fancy-ish hotel room, having just consumed a lovely Thai meal of big salad and chicken satay…with my fingers, because I forgot that I do not have eating utensils at this particular Temporary Home. Thank goodness for towels, is all I can say.  Peanut sauce was involved.

There were no grains in this meal (well, the chicken came with a slice of Wonder-what-that-is bread, an embellishment I do not typically consider when I think of Thai food) (and would not have consumed even if I did) and I am not missing them — in fact, I suspect that I’m a touch more alert at this hour (10 pm and counting) than I might have been had I had my usual brown rice serving beside. In fact, I’m thinking that I might experiment with eating no grains at all for a little while, just to see what happens.  A couple years ago I could not have even imagined doing this — but now, it feels right. Of course I’ll keep you posted.

Read more »